What is a Patient Information Leaflet and why is it useful?

The Patient Information Leaflet (PIL) is the leaflet included in the pack with a medicine. It is written for patients and gives information about taking or using a medicine. It is possible that the leaflet in your medicine pack may differ from this version because it may have been updated since your medicine was packaged.

Below is a text only representation of the Patient Information Leaflet. The original leaflet can be viewed using the link above.

The text only version may be available in large print, Braille or audio CD. For further information call emc accessibility on 0800 198 5000. The product code(s) for this leaflet are: PL04425/0181, PL04425/0672.


Cidomycin Solution for Injection

PACKAGE LEAFLET : INFORMATION FOR THE PATIENT

Cidomycin® 80mg/2ml Solution for Injection

Gentamicin

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Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine because it contains important information for you.

  • Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
  • If you have further questions, ask your doctor or nurse.
  • This medicine has been prescribed for you only. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their signs of illness are the same as yours.
  • If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4.

What is in this leaflet:

1. What Cidomycin is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you have Cidomycin
3. How to have Cidomycin
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Cidomycin
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What Cidomycin is and what it is used for

The name of this medicine is Cidomycin 80mg/2ml Solution for Injection (called Cidomycin throughout this leaflet). It contains a medicine called gentamicin. This belongs to a group of antibiotics called ‘aminoglycosides’.

Cidomycin is used to treat infections caused by bacteria. This includes infections in:

  • Your urinary tract (including your kidneys or bladder)
  • Your chest (including your lungs)
  • Your abdomen (including your gut)
  • Your brain and spinal cord
  • Your blood – this is sometimes called ‘bacteraemia’ or ‘septicaemia’
  • Newborn babies

2. What you need to know before you have Cidomycin

Do not have Cidomycin if:

  • You are allergic (hypersensitive) to gentamicin, any other antibiotics or to any of the other ingredients of this medicine (see section 6). Signs of an allergic reaction include: a rash, swallowing or breathing problems, swelling of your lips, face, throat and tongue.
  • You have myasthenia gravis. This is a disease that causes muscle weakness.

Do not have this medicine if any of the above applies to you. If you are not sure, talk to your doctor or nurse before having Cidomycin.

Warnings and precautions

Talk to your doctor or nurse before having Cidomycin if:

  • You are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or are planning to have a baby.
  • You are breast-feeding or are planning to breast-feed.
  • You have any muscle weakness problems.
  • You are extremely overweight (obese).
  • You have kidney problems.
  • You have cystic fibrosis.
  • You are elderly (over 65 years of age) or the patient is less than 1 year old.

Your doctor will need to monitor you before, during and shortly after your treatment. Your doctor may check your hearing, balance, how your kidneys are working and the amount of gentamicin in your blood. This is to prevent damage to your ears and/or kidneys and is particularly important if you have kidney problems, are obese, suffer from cystic fibrosis or are over 65 years of age, or the patient is less than 1 year old.

If you are not sure if any of the above applies to you, talk to your doctor or nurse before having Cidomycin.

Other medicines and Cidomycin

Tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking, have recently taken or might take any other medicines.

This includes medicines you buy without a prescription, including herbal medicines. This is because Cidomycin can affect the way some other medicines work. Also, some medicines can affect the way Cidomycin works.

In particular tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following:

  • Medicines used to thin the blood such as warfarin.
  • Water tablets or injections (diuretics) such as furosemide or etacrynic acid.
  • Amphotericin B (used to treat fungal infections).
  • Cephalosporin antibiotics such as cephaloridine.
  • Ciclosporin (used in organ transplants or for severe skin problems).
  • Neostigmine or pyridostigmine (used to treat myasthenia gravis).
  • Muscle relaxants – sometimes used during operations which need an anaesthetic.
  • Indometacin (used to treat pain or swelling).
  • Bisphosphonates (used to treat osteoporosis).
  • Cisplatin (used to treat some cancers).
  • Botulinum toxin – used to lower the activity of overactive muscles. This is also sometimes used in cosmetic procedures.

These medicines may increase the chances of getting certain side effects. If you are unsure about any of the above, consult your doctor or nurse.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Ask your doctor or nurse for advice before having this medicine if:

  • You are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or are planning to have a baby. Cidomycin should not normally be used during pregnancy.
  • You are breast-feeding or are planning to breast-feed.

Cidomycin contains very little sodium

It contains less than 1mmol sodium (23mg) per ampoule or vial.

3. How to have Cidomycin

Cidomycin is always given to you by a doctor or nurse. This is because it needs to be given as an injection.

Having this medicine

Your doctor will decide how much to give you, depending on your weight. The correct dose also depends on the type of infection and any other illnesses you may have, in particular diseases of the kidney.

Tests

Blood samples will be taken by your doctor or nurse to check the dose is right for you. You should not receive Cidomycin if these blood tests cannot be performed. You may also need tests to check your hearing and balance.

Elderly or obese people, newborns, people with impaired kidney function and those with cystic fibrosis should be particularly closely monitored when having this medicine.

How much Cidomycin is given

Adults

  • The usual daily dose in adults is 3-5mg for each kg of body weight.
  • This is is given either as one single dose (preferred) or split into two or three daily doses.
  • This dose may be increased or decreased by your doctor depending on your illness and the results of your blood tests.
  • If you have kidney problems your doctor may give you a lower dose or may prolong the interval between doses.

Use in children and adolescents

Children (aged 1 year and above)

  • The usual daily dose is 3-6mg for each kg of body weight.
  • This is given either as one single dose (preferred) or split into two separate doses.

Babies (aged 4 weeks to 1 year)

  • The usual daily dose is 4.5-7.5mg for each kg of body weight.
  • This is given either as one single dose (preferred) or split into two separate doses.

Premature babies or new born babies (up to 4 weeks)

  • The usual daily dose is 4-7mg for each kg of body weight.
  • This is given in one single dose.

If you have more Cidomycin than prescribed

It is most unlikely that you will be given too much medicine by the doctor or nurse. Your doctor or nurse will be checking your progress and checking the medicine that you are given. Ask if you are not sure why you are getting a dose of medicine.

If you miss a dose of Cidomycin

Your doctor or nurse have instructions about when to give you your medicine. It is most unlikely that you will not be given the medicine as it has been prescribed. If you think that you may have missed a dose then talk to your nurse or doctor.

If you stop having Cidomycin

It is important that the course of treatment your doctor has prescribed is finished. You may start to feel better but it is important to continue your treatment until the doctor advises. If you stop, your infection may get worse again.

4. Possible side effects

Like all medicines, this medicine can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Tell your doctor straight away if you notice any of the following serious side effects – you may need urgent medical treatment:

Not known (frequency cannot be estimated from available data)

Allergic reactions (including serious allergic reactions such as anaphylaxis), which may include:

  • An itchy, lumpy rash (hives) or nettle rash (urticaria)
  • Swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, face, lips or throat which may cause difficulty in swallowing or breathing
  • Fainting, dizziness, feeling lightheaded (low blood pressure)

Tell your doctor or nurse as soon as possible if any of the following side effects happen:

Very rare side effects (may affect less than 1 in 10,000 people)

  • Acute kidney failure, which may cause you to pass less urine than is normal for you, fluid retention, breathlessness or fatigue/tiredness

Not known (frequency cannot be estimated from available data)

  • Temporary or irreversible hearing loss or deafness
  • Unusual difficulty in moving which has not happened before
  • Numbness, weakness and pain in the arms and legs (peripheral neuropathy)
  • Blood in the urine
  • Diarrhoea, with or without blood and/or stomach cramps

Tell your doctor or nurse if any of the following side effects gets serious or last longer than a few days. Also tell them if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet

Very common side effects (may affect more than 1 in 10 people)

  • Feeling sick (vomiting)

Not known (frequency cannot be estimated from available data)

  • Feeling sick (nausea)
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Rash, itching or a purplish or reddish-brown skin colouring
  • Depression
  • Seeing or hearing things that are not real (hallucinations)
  • Feeling confused, tired or weak
  • Fits

Other possible side effects:

Very rare side effects (may affect less than 1 in 10,000 people)

  • High levels of phosphate and amino acids (so-called Fanconi-like syndrome, associated with high doses given over a long time)

Not known (frequency cannot be estimated from available data)

  • Changes in the number of blood cells (including anaemia) – shown up in the results of blood tests
  • Changes in the amount of liver enzymes – shown up in the results of blood tests
  • A decrease in the level of magnesium in the blood, associated with prolonged therapy

Reporting of side effects

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard or search for MHRA Yellow Card in the Google Play or Apple App Store. By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

5. How to store Cidomycin

  • This medicine will be kept by your doctor or nurse in a safe place out of the sight and reach of children.
  • You will not be asked to store your medicine. It will be brought to you ready to be given straight away.
  • Do not store this medicine above 25°C. It should not be kept in a fridge or freezer.
  • Do not have this medicine after the expiry date. This is stated in month and year on the carton and on the label after “EXP”. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month. If you are not sure when this is, check with your doctor or nurse.
  • Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater. Ask your pharmacist how to throw away medicines you no longer use. These measures will help protect the environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other information

What Cidomycin contains

  • The active substance is gentamicin sulphate equivalent to 80mg of gentamicin.
  • The other ingredients are sulphuric acid and sodium hydroxide (for pH adjustment), sodium chloride and water for injections.

What Cidomycin looks like and contents of the pack

The medicine is a clear, colourless solution for injection in 2ml ampoules or vials. Cidomycin is available in packs of 5 glass ampoules with an OPC (one point cut) break system and red and green rings or in packs of 5 glass vials closed with a chlorobutyl rubber stopper sealed with an aluminium capsule type flip-off.

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer:

Marketing Authorisation Holder

Sanofi
410 Thames Valley Park Drive
Reading
Berkshire
RG6 1PT
UK
Tel: 0845 372 7101

Manufacturer

FAMAR HEALTH CARE SERVICES MADRID, S.A.U
Avda. Leganes 62
Alcorcon 28923
Madrid
Spain

This leaflet does not contain all the information about your medicine. If you have any questions or are not sure about anything, ask your doctor or nurse.

This leaflet was last revised in 07/2019

© Sanofi, 1973 – 2019

11503321-04