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Aldara 5% Cream

Last Updated on eMC 24-Jun-2010 View changes  | Meda Pharmaceuticals Contact details

1. Name of the medicinal product

ALDARA 5% cream

2. Qualitative and quantitative composition

Each sachet contains 12.5 mg of imiquimod in 250 mg cream (5 %).

100 mg of cream contains 5 mg of imiquimod.

Excipients:

Methyl hydroxybenzoate (E218)

Propyl hydroxybenzoate (E216)

Cetyl alcohol

Stearyl alcohol

For a full list of excipients, see section 6.1.

3. Pharmaceutical form

Cream.

White to slightly yellow cream.

4. Clinical particulars
4.1 Therapeutic indications

Imiquimod cream is indicated for the topical treatment of :

• External genital and perianal warts (condylomata acuminata) in adults.

• Small superficial basal cell carcinomas (sBCCs) in adults.

• Clinically typical, nonhyperkeratotic, nonhypertrophic actinic keratoses (AKs) on the face or scalp in immunocompetent adult patients when size or number of lesions limit the efficacy and/or acceptability of cryotherapy and other topical treatment options are contraindicated or less appropriate.

4.2 Posology and method of administration

Posology

The application frequency and duration of treatment with imiquimod cream is different for each indication.

External genital warts in adults:

Imiquimod cream should be applied 3 times per week (example: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; or Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday) prior to normal sleeping hours, and should remain on the skin for 6 to 10 hours. Imiquimod cream treatment should continue until the clearance of visible genital orperianal warts or for a maximum of 16 weeks per episode of warts.

For quantity to be applied see 4.2 Method of administration.

Superficial basal cell carcinoma in adults:

Apply imiquimod cream for 6 weeks, 5 times per week (example: Monday to Friday) prior to normal sleeping hours, and leave on the skin for approximately 8 hours.

For quantity to be applied see 4.2 Method of administration.

Actinic keratosis in adults

Treatment should be initiated and monitored by a physician. Imiquimod cream should be applied 3 times per week (example: Monday, Wednesday and Friday) for four weeks prior to normal sleeping hours, and left on the skin for approximately 8 hours. Sufficient cream should be applied to cover the treatment area. After a 4-week treatment-free period, clearance of AKs should be assessed. If any lesions persist, treatment should be repeated for another four weeks.

The maximum recommended dose is one sachet. The maximum recommended treatment duration is 8 weeks.

An interruption of dosing should be considered if intense local inflammatory reactions occur (see section 4.4) or if infection is observed at the treatment site. In this latter case, appropriate other measures should be taken. Each treatment period should not be extended beyond 4 weeks due to missed doses or rest periods.

If the treated lesion(s) show an incomplete response at the follow-up examination at 4-8 weeks after the second treatment period, a different therapy should be used (see section 4.4)

Information applicable to all indications:

If a dose is missed, the patient should apply the cream as soon as he/she remember and then he/she should continue with the regular schedule. However the cream should not be applied more than once a day.

Paediatric patients

Use in the paediatric patient population is not recommended. There are no data available on the use of imiquimod in children and adolescents in the approved indications.

Aldara should not be used in children with molluscum contagiosum due to lack of efficacy in this indication (see section 5.1).

Method of administration

External genital warts:

Imiquimod cream should be applied in a thin layer and rubbed on the clean wart area until the cream vanishes. Only apply to affected areas and avoid any application on internal surfaces. Imiquimod cream should be applied prior to normal sleeping hours. During the 6 to 10 hour treatment period, showering or bathing should be avoided. After this period it is essential that imiquimod cream is removed with mild soap and water. Application of an excess of cream or prolonged contact with the skin may result in a severe application site reaction (see sections 4.4, 4.8 and 4.9). A single-use sachet is sufficient to cover a wart area of 20 cm2 (approx. 3 inches2). Sachets should not be re-used once opened. Hands should be washed carefully before and after application of cream.

Uncircumcised males treating warts under the foreskin should retract the foreskin and wash the area daily (see section 4.4).

Superficial basal cell carcinoma:

Before applying imiquimod cream, patients should wash the treatment area with mild soap and water and dry thoroughly. Sufficient cream should be applied to cover the treatment area, including one centimetre of skin surrounding the tumour. The cream should be rubbed into the treatment area until the cream vanishes. The cream should be applied prior to normal sleeping hours and remain on the skin for approximately 8 hours. During this period, showering and bathing should be avoided. After this period it is essential that imiquimod cream is removed with mild soap and water.

Sachets should not be re-used once opened. Hands should be washed carefully before and after application of cream.

Response of the treated tumour to imiquimod cream should be assessed 12 weeks after the end of treatment. If the treated tumour shows an incomplete response, a different therapy should be used (see section 4.4).

A rest period of several days may be taken (see section 4.4) if the local skin reaction to imiquimod cream causes excessive discomfort to the patient, or if infection is observed at the treatment site. In this latter case, appropriate other measures should be taken.

Actinic keratosis:

Before applying imiquimod cream, patients should wash the treatment area with mild soap and water and dry thoroughly. Sufficient cream should be applied to cover the treatment area. The cream should be rubbed into the treatment area until the cream vanishes. The cream should be applied prior to normal sleeping hours and remain on the skin for approximately 8 hours. During this period, showering and bathing should be avoided. After this period it is essential that imiquimod cream is removed with mild soap and water. Sachets should not be re-used once opened. Hands should be washed carefully before and after application of cream.

4.3 Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to the active substance or to any of the excipients.

4.4 Special warnings and precautions for use

External genital warts, superficial basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis:

Avoid contact with the eyes, lips and nostrils.

Imiquimod has the potential to exacerbate inflammatory conditions of the skin.

Imiquimod cream should be used with caution in patients with autoimmune conditions (refer to section 4.5). Consideration should be given to balancing the benefit of imiquimod treatment for these patients with the risk associated with a possible worsening of their autoimmune condition.

Imiquimod cream should be used with caution in organ transplant patients (refer to section 4.5). Consideration should be given to balancing the benefit of imiquimod treatment for these patients with the risk associated with the possibility of organ rejection or graft-versus-host disease.

Imiquimod cream therapy is not recommended until the skin has healed after any previous drug or surgical treatment. Application to broken skin could result in increased systemic absorption of imiquimod leadling to a greater risk of adverse events (refer to section 4.8 and 4.9)

The use of an occlusive dressing is not recommended with imiquimod cream therapy.

The excipients methylhydroxybenzoate (E218), propylhydroxybenzoate (E216), cetyl alcohol and stearyl alcohol may cause allergic reactions.

Rarely, intense local inflammatory reactions including skin weeping or erosion can occur after only a few applications of imiquimod cream. Local inflammatory reactions may be accompanied, or even preceded, by flu-like systemic signs and symptoms including malaise, pyrexia, nausea, myalgias and rigors. An interruption of dosing should be considered.

Imiquimod should be used with caution in patients with reduced haematologic reserve (refer to section 4.8d).

External genital warts:

There is limited experience in the use of imiquimod cream in the treatment of men with foreskin-associated warts. The safety database in uncircumcised men treated with imiquimod cream three times weekly and carrying out a daily foreskin hygiene routine is less than 100 patients. In other studies, in which a daily foreskin hygiene routine was not followed, there were two cases of severe phimosis and one case of stricture leading to circumcision. Treatment in this patient population is therefore recommended only in men who are able or willing to follow the daily foreskin hygiene routine. Early signs of stricture may include local skin reactions (e.g. erosion, ulceration, oedema, induration), or increasing difficulty in retracting the foreskin. If these symptoms occur, the treatment should be stopped immediately. Based on current knowledge, treating urethral, intra-vaginal, cervical, rectal or intra-anal warts is not recommended. Imiquimod cream therapy should not be initiated in tissues where open sores or wounds exist until after the area has healed.

Local skin reactions such as erythema, erosion, excoriation, flaking and oedema are common. Other local reactions such as induration, ulceration, scabbing, and vesicles have also been reported. Should an intolerable skin reaction occur, the cream should be removed by washing the area with mild soap and water. Treatment with imiquimod cream can be resumed after the skin reaction has moderated.

The risk of severe local skin reactions may be increased when imiquimod is used at higher than recommended doses (see section 4.2). However, in rare cases severe local reactions that have required treatment and/or caused temporary incapacitation have been observed in patients who have used imiquimod according to the instructions. Where such reactions have occurred at the urethral meatus, some women have experienced difficulty in urinating, sometimes requiring emergency catheterisation and treatment of the affected area.

No clinical experience exists with imiquimod cream immediately following treatment with other cutaneously applied drugs for treatment of external genital or perianal warts. Imiquimod cream should be washed from the skin before sexual activity. Imiquimod cream may weaken condoms and diaphragms, therefore concurrent use with imiquimod cream is not recommended. Alternative forms of contraception should be considered.

In immunocompromised patients, repeat treatment with imiquimod cream is not recommended.

While limited data have shown an increased rate of wart reduction in HIV positive patients, imiquimod cream has not been shown to be as effective in terms of wart clearance in this patient group.

Superficial basal cell carcinoma:

Imiquimod has not been evaluated for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma within 1 cm of the eyelids, nose, lips or hairline.

During therapy and until healed, affected skin is likely to appear noticeably different from normal skin. Local skin reactions are common but these reactions generally decrease in intensity during therapy or resolve after cessation of imiquimod cream therapy. There is an association between the complete clearance rate and the intensity of local skin reactions (e.g. erythema). These local skin reactions may be related to the stimulation of local immune response. If required by the patient's discomfort or the severity of the local skin reaction, a rest period of several days may be taken. Treatment with imiquimod cream can be resumed after the skin reaction has moderated.

The clinical outcome of therapy can be determined after regeneration of the treated skin, approximately 12 weeks after the end of treatment.

No clinical experience exists with the use of imiquimod cream in immunocompromised patients.

No clinical experience exists in patients with recurrent and previously treated BCCs, therefore use for previously treated tumours is not recommended.

Data from an open label clinical trial suggest that large tumours (>7.25 cm2) are less likely to respond to imiquimod therapy.

The skin surface area treated should be protected from solar exposure.

Actinic keratosis

Lesions clinically atypical for AK or suspicious for malignancy should be biopsied to determine appropriate treatment.

Imiquimod has not been evaluated for the treatment of actinic keratoses on the eyelids, the inside of the nostrils or ears, or the lip area inside the vermilion border.

There are very limited data available on the use of imiquimod for the treatment of actinic keratoses in anatomical locations other than the face and scalp. The available data on actinic keratosis on the forearms and hands do not support efficacy in this indication and therefore such use is not recommended.

Imiquimod is not recommended for the treatment of AK lesions with marked hyperkeratosis or hypertrophy as seen in cutaneous horns.

During therapy and until healed, affected skin is likely to appear noticeably different from normal skin. Local skin reactions are common but these reactions generally decrease in intensity during therapy or resolve after cessation of imiquimod cream therapy. There is an association between the complete clearance rate and the intensity of local skin reactions (e.g. erythema). These local skin reactions may be related to the stimulation of local immune response. If required by the patient's discomfort or the intensity of the local skin reaction, a rest period of several days may be taken. Treatment with imiquimod cream can be resumed after the skin reaction has moderated.

Each treatment period should not be extended beyond 4 weeks due to missed doses or rest periods.

The clinical outcome of therapy can be determined after regeneration of the treated skin, approximately 4-8 weeks after the end of treatment.

No clinical experience exists with the use of imiquimod cream in immunocompromised patients.

No data are available on re-treating actinic keratoses that have cleared after one or two courses of treatment and subsequently recur, and any such use is therefore not recommended.

Data from an open-label clinical trial suggest that subjects with more than 8 AK lesions showed a decreased rate of complete clearance compared to patients with less than 8 lesions.

The skin surface area treated should be protected from solar exposure.

4.5 Interaction with other medicinal products and other forms of interaction

No interaction studies have been performed. This includes studies with immunosuppressive drugs. Interactions with systemic drugs would be limited by the minimal percutaneous absorption of imiquimod cream.

Due to its immunostimulating properties, imiquimod cream should be used with caution in patients who are receiving immunosuppressive medication (see Section 4.4).

4.6 Pregnancy and lactation

For imiquimod no clinical data on exposed pregnancies are available. Animal studies do not indicate direct or indirect harmful effects with respect to pregnancy, embryonal/foetal development, parturition or postnatal development (see 5.3). Caution should be exercised when prescribing to pregnant women.

As no quantifiable levels (>5 ng/ml) of imiquimod are detected in the serum after single and multiple topical doses, no specific advice can be given on whether to use or not in lactating mothers.

4.7 Effects on ability to drive and use machines

No studies on the effects on the ability to drive and use machines have been performed. From the undesirable effects noted in section 4.8, it is unlikely that treatment will have any effect on the ability to drive and use machines.

4.8 Undesirable effects

a) General Description:

External genital warts:

In the pivotal trials with 3 times a week dosing, the most frequently reported adverse drug reactions judged to be probably or possibly related to imiquimod cream treatment were application site reactions at the wart treatment site (33.7% of imiquimod treated patients). Some systemic adverse reactions, including headache (3.7%), influenza-like symptoms (1.1%), and myalgia (1.5%) were also reported.

Patient reported adverse reactions from 2292 patients treated with imiquimod cream in placebo controlled and open clinical studies are presented below. These adverse events are considered at least possibly causally related to treatment with imiquimod.

Superficial basal cell carcinoma:

In trials with 5 times per week dosing 58% of patients experienced at least one adverse event. The most frequently reported adverse events from the trials judged probably or possibly related to imiquimod cream are application site disorders, with a frequency of 28.1%. Some systemic adverse reactions, including back pain (1.1%) and influenza-like symptoms (0.5%) were reported by imiquimod cream patients.

Patient reported adverse reactions from 185 patients treated with imiquimod cream in placebo controlled phase III clinical studies for superficial basal cell carcinoma are presented below. These adverse events are considered at least possibly causally related to treatment with imiquimod.

Actinic keratosis

In the pivotal trials with 3 times per week dosing for up to 2 courses each of 4 weeks, 56% of imiquimod patients reported at least one adverse event. The most frequently reported adverse event from these trials judged probably or possibly related to imiquimod cream was application site reactions (22% of imiquimod treated patients). Some systemic adverse reactions, including myalgia (2%) were reported by imiquimod treated patients.

Patient reported adverse reactions from 252 patients treated with imiquimod cream in vehicle controlled phase III clinical studies for actinic keratosis are presented below. These adverse events are considered at least possibly causally related to treatment with imiquimod.

b) Tabular Listing of adverse events:

Frequencies are defined as Very common (≥1/10), Common (≥1/100 to <1/10) and Uncommon (≥1/1,000 to <1/100). Lower frequencies from clinical trials are not reported here.

 

External genital warts

(3x/ wk,16wks)

N = 2292

Superficial basal cell carcinoma

(5x/wk, 6 wks)

N = 185

Actinic keratosis

(3x/wk, 4 or 8 wks)

N = 252

Infections and infestations:

   

Infection

Common

Common

Uncommon

Pustules

 

Common

Uncommon

Herpes simplex

Uncommon

  

Genital candidiasis

Uncommon

  

Vaginitis

Uncommon

  

Bacterial infection

Uncommon

  

Fungal infection

Uncommon

  

Upper respiratory tract infection

Uncommon

  

Vulvitis

Uncommon

  

Rhinitis

  

Uncommon

Influenza

  

Uncommon

Blood and lymphatic system disorders:

   

Lymphadenopathy

Uncommon

Common

Uncommon

Metabolism and nutrition disorders:

   

Anorexia

Uncommon

 

Common

Psychiatric disorders:

   

Insomnia

Uncommon

  

Depression

Uncommon

 

Uncommon

Irritability

 

Uncommon

 

Nervous system disorders:

   

Headache

Common

 

Common

Paraesthesia

Uncommon

  

Dizziness

Uncommon

  

Migraine

Uncommon

  

Somnolence

Uncommon

  

Eye disorders

   

Conjunctival irritation

  

Uncommon

Eyelid oedema

  

Uncommon

Ear and labyrinth disorders:

   

Tinnitus

Uncommon

  

Vascular disorders:

   

Flushing

Uncommon

  

Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders:

   

Pharyngitis

Uncommon

  

Rhinitis

Uncommon

  

Nasal congestion

  

Uncommon

Pharyngo laryngeal pain

  

Uncommon

Gastrointestinal disorders:

  

 

Nausea

Common

Uncommon

Common

Abdominal pain

Uncommon

  

Diarrhoea

Uncommon

 

Uncommon

Vomiting

Uncommon

  

Rectal disorder

Uncommon

  

Rectal tenesmus

Uncommon

  

Dry mouth

 

Uncommon

 

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders:

   

Pruritus

Uncommon

  

Dermatitis

Uncommon

Uncommon

 

Folliculitis

Uncommon

  

Rash erythematous

Uncommon

  

Eczema

Uncommon

  

Rash

Uncommon

  

Sweating increased

Uncommon

  

Urticaria

Uncommon

  

Actinic keratosis

  

Uncommon

Erythema

  

Uncommon

Face oedema

  

Uncommon

Skin ulcer

  

Uncommon

Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders:

   

Myalgia

Common

 

Common

Arthralgia

Uncommon

 

Common

Back pain

Uncommon

Common

 

Pain in extremity

  

Uncommon

Renal and urinary disorders:

   

Dysuria

Uncommon

  

Reproductive system and breast disorders:

   

Genital pain male

Uncommon

  

Penile disorder

Uncommon

  

Dyspareunia

Uncommon

  

Erectile dysfunction

Uncommon

  

Uterovaginal prolapse

Uncommon

  

Vaginal pain

Uncommon

  

Vaginitis atrophic

Uncommon

  

Vulval disorder

Uncommon

  

General disorders and administration site conditions:

   

Application site pruritus

Very common

Very common

Very common

Application site pain

Very common

Common

Common

Application site burning

Common

Common

Common

Application site irritation

Common

Common

Common

Application site erythema

 

Common

Common

Application site reaction

  

Common

Application site bleeding

 

Common

Uncommon

Application site papules

 

Common

Uncommon

Application site paraesthesia

 

Common

Uncommon

Application site rash

 

Common

 

Fatigue

Common

 

Common

Pyrexia

Uncommon

 

Uncommon

Influenza-like illness

Uncommon

Uncommon

 

Pain

Uncommon

 

 

Asthenia

Uncommon

 

Uncommon

Malaise

Uncommon

  

Rigors

Uncommon

 

Uncommon

Application site dermatitis

  

Uncommon

Application site discharge

 

Uncommon

Uncommon

Application site hyperaesthesia

  

Uncommon

Application site inflammation

 

Uncommon

 

Application site oedema

 

Uncommon

Uncommon

Application site scabbing

 

Uncommon

Uncommon

Application site scar

  

Uncommon

Application site skin breakdown

 

Uncommon

 

Application site swelling

 

Uncommon

Uncommon

Application site ulcer

  

Uncommon

Application site vesicles

 

Uncommon

Uncommon

Application site warmth

  

Uncommon

Lethargy

 

Uncommon

 

Discomfort

  

Uncommon

Inflammation

  

Uncommon

c) Frequently occurring adverse events:

External genital warts:

Investigators of placebo controlled trials were required to evaluate protocol mandated clinical signs (skin reactions). These protocol mandated clinical sign assessments indicate that local skin reactions including erythema (61%), erosion (30%), excoriation/flaking/scaling (23%) and oedema (14%) were common in these placebo controlled clinical trials with imiquimod cream applied three times weekly (see section 4.4). Local skin reactions, such as erythema, are probably an extension of the pharmacologic effects of imiquimod cream.

Remote site skin reactions, mainly erythema (44%), were also reported in the placebo controlled trials. These reactions were at non-wart sites which may have been in contact with imiquimod cream. Most skin reactions were mild to moderate in severity and resolved within 2 weeks of treatment discontinuation. However, in some cases these reactions have been severe, requiring treatment and/or causing incapacitation. In very rare cases, severe reactions at the urethral meatus have resulted in dysuria in women (see section 4.4).

Superficial basal cell carcinoma:

Investigators of the placebo controlled clinical trials were required to evaluate protocol mandated clinical signs (skin reactions). These protocol mandated clinical sign assessments indicate that severe erythema (31%) severe erosions (13%) and severe scabbing and crusting (19%) were very common in these trials with imiquimod cream applied 5 times weekly. Local skin reactions, such as erythema, are probably an extension of the pharmacologic effect of imiquimod cream.

Skin infections during treatment with imiquimod have been observed. While serious sequelae have not resulted, the possibility of infection in broken skin should always be considered.

Actinic keratosis

In clinical trials of imiquimod cream 3 times weekly for 4 or 8 weeks the most frequently occurring application site reactions were itching at the target site (14%) and burning at the target site (5%). Severe erythema (24%) and severe scabbing and crusting (20%) were very common. Local skin reactions, such as erythema, are probably an extension of the pharmacologic effect of imiquimod cream. See 4.2 and 4.4 for information on rest periods.

Skin infections during treatment with imiquimod have been observed. While serious sequelae have not resulted, the possibility of infection in broken skin should always be considered.

d) Adverse events applicable to all indications:

Reports have been received of localised hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation following imiquimod cream use. Follow-up information suggests that these skin colour changes may be permanent in some patients. In a follow-up of 162 patients five years after treatment for sBCC a mild hypopigmentation was observed in 37% of the patients and a moderate hypopigmentation was observed in 6% of the patients. 56% of the patients have been free of hypopigmentation; hyperpigmentation has not been reported.

Clinical studies investigating the use of imiquimod for the treatment of actinic keratosis have detected a 0.4% (5/1214) frequency of alopecia at the treatment site or surrounding area. Postmarketing reports of suspected alopecia occurring during the treatment of sBCC and EGW have been received.

Reductions in haemoglobin, white blood cell count, absolute neutrophils and platelets have been observed in clinical trials. These reductions are not considered to be clinically significant in patients with normal haematologic reserve. Patients with reduced haematologic reserve have not been studied in clinical trials. Reductions in haematological parameters requiring clinical intervention have been reported from postmarketing experience. There have been postmarketing reports of elevated liver enzymes.

Rare reports have been received of exacerbation of autoimmune conditions.

Rare cases of remote site dermatologic drug reactions, including erythema multiforme, have been reported from clinical trials. Serious skin reactions reported from postmarketing experience include erythema multiforme, Stevens Johnson syndrome and cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

e) Paediatric patients:

Imiquimod was investigated in controlled clinical studies with paediatric patients (see sections 4.2 and 5.1). There was no evidence for systemic reactions. Application site reactions occurred more frequently after imiquimod than after vehicle, however, incidence and intensity of these reactions were not different from that seen in the licensed indications in adults. There was no evidence for serious adverse reaction caused by imiquimod in paediatric patients.

4.9 Overdose

When applied topically, systemic overdosage with imiquimod cream is unlikely due to minimal percutaneous absorption. Studies in rabbits reveal a dermal lethal dose of greater than 5 g/kg. Persistent dermal overdosing of imiquimod cream could result in severe local skin reactions.

Following accidental ingestion, nausea, emesis, headache, myalgia and fever could occur after a single dose of 200 mg imiquimod which corresponds to the content of approximately 16 sachets. The most clinically serious adverse event reported following multiple oral doses of ≥ 200 mg was hypotension which resolved following oral or intravenous fluid administration.

5. Pharmacological properties
5.1 Pharmacodynamic properties

Pharmacotherapeutic group: Chemotherapeutics for topical use, antivirals : ATC Code : D06BB10.

Imiquimod is an immune response modifier. Saturable binding studies suggest a membrane receptor for imiquimod exists on responding immune cells. Imiquimod has no direct antiviral activity. In animal models imiquimod is effective against viral infections and acts as an antitumour agent principally by induction of alpha interferon and other cytokines. The induction of alpha interferon and other cytokines following imiquimod cream application to genital wart tissue has also been demonstrated in clinical studies.

Increases in systemic levels of alpha interferon and other cytokines following topical application of imiquimod were demonstrated in a pharmacokinetic study.

External genital warts:

Clinical Efficacy

The results of 3 phase III pivotal efficacy studies showed that treatment with imiquimod for sixteen weeks was significantly more effective than treatment with vehicle as measured by total clearance of treated warts.

In 119 imiquimod-treated female patients, the combined total clearance rate was 60% as compared to 20% in 105 vehicle-treated patients (95% CI for rate difference: 20% to 61% , p<0.001). In those imiquimod patients who achieved total clearance of their warts, the median time to clearance was 8 weeks.

In 157 imiquimod-treated male patients, the combined total clearance rate was 23% as compared to 5% in 161 vehicle-treated patients (95%CI for rate difference: 3% to 36% , p<0.001). In those imiquimod patients who achieved total clearance of their warts, the median time to clearance was 12 weeks.

Superficial basal cell carcinoma:

Clinical efficacy:

The efficacy of imiquimod 5 times per week for 6 weeks was studied in two double-blind vehicle controlled clinical trials. Target tumours were histologically confirmed single primary superficial basal cell carcinomas with a minimum size of 0.5 cm2 and a maximum diameter of 2 cm. Tumours located within 1 cm of the eyes, nose, mouth, ears or hairline were excluded. In a pooled analysis of these two studies, histological clearance was noted in 82% (152/185) of patients. When clinical assessment was also included, clearance judged by this composite endpoint was noted in 75% (139/185) of patients. These results were statistically significant (p<0.001) by comparison with the vehicle group, 3% (6/179) and 2% (3/179) respectively. There was a significant association between the intensity of local skin reactions (e.g. erythema) seen during the treatment period and complete clearance of the basal cell carcinoma.

Five -year data from a long-term open-label uncontrolled study indicate that an estimated 77.9% [95% CI (71.9%, 83.8%)] of all the subjects who initially received treatment became clinically clear and remained clear at 60 months.

Actinic keratosis:

Clinical efficacy:

The efficacy of imiquimod applied 3 times per week for one or two courses of 4 weeks, separated by a 4 week treatment-free period, was studied in two double-blind vehicle controlled clinical trials. Patients had clinically typical, visible, discrete, nonhyperkeratotic, nonhypertrophic AK lesions on the balding scalp or face within a contiguous 25 cm2 treatment area. 4-8 AK lesions were treated. The complete clearance rate (imiquimod minus placebo) for the combined trials was 46.1% (CI 39.0%, 53.1%).

One-year data from two combined observational studies indicate a recurrence rate of 27% (35/128 patients) in those patients who became clinically clear after one or two courses of treatment. The recurrence rate for individual lesions was 5.6% (41/737). Corresponding recurrence rates for vehicle were 47% (8/17 patients) and 7.5% (6/80 lesions). The rate of progression to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was reported in 1.6% (2/128 patients).

There are no data on recurrence and progression rates beyond 1 year.

Paediatric patients:

The approved indications genital warts, actinic keratosis and superficial basal cell carcinoma are conditions not generally seen within the paediatric population and were not studied.

Aldara Cream has been evaluated in four randomised, vehicle controlled, double-blind trials in children aged 2 to 15 years with molluscum contagiosum (imiquimod n = 576, vehicle n = 313) . These trials failed to demonstrate efficacy of imiquimod at any of the tested dosage regimens (3x/week for 16 weeks and 7x/week for 8 weeks).

5.2 Pharmacokinetic properties

External genital warts, superficial basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis:

Less than 0.9% of a topically applied single dose of radiolabelled imiquimod was absorbed through the skin of human subjects. The small amount of drug which was absorbed into the systemic circulation was promptly excreted by both urinary and faecal routes at a mean ratio of approximately 3 to 1. No quantifiable levels (>5 ng/ml) of drug were detected in serum after single or multiple topical doses.

Systemic exposure (percutaneous penetration) was calculated from recovery of carbon-14 from [14C] imiquimod in urine and faeces.

Minimal systemic absorption of imiquimod 5% cream across the skin of 58 patients with actinic keratosis was observed with 3 times per week dosing for 16 weeks. The extent of percutaneous absorption did not change significantly between the first and last doses of this study. Peak serum drug concentrations at the end of week 16 were observed between 9 and 12 hours and were 0.1, 0.2, and 1.6 ng/mL for the applications to face (12.5 mg, 1 single-use sachet), scalp (25 mg, 2 sachets) and hands/arms (75 mg, 6 sachets), respectively. The application surface area was not controlled in the scalp and hands/ arms groups. Dose proportionality was not observed. An apparent half-life was calculated that was approximately 10 times greater than the 2 hour half-life seen following subcutaneous dosing in a previous study, suggesting prolonged retention of drug in the skin. Urinary recovery was less than 0.6% of the applied dose at week 16 in these patients.

Paediatric patients:

The pharmacokinetic properties of imiquimod following single and multiple topical application in paediatric patients with molluscum contagiosum (MC) have been investigated. The systemic exposure data demonstrated that the extent of absorption of imiquimod following topical application to the MC lesional skin of the paediatric patients aged 6-12 years was low and comparable to that observed in healthy adults and adults with actinic keratosis or superficial basal cell carcinoma. In younger patients aged 2-5 years absorption, based on Cmax values, was higher compared to adults.

5.3 Preclinical safety data

Non-clinical data revealed no special hazard for humans based on conventional studies of safety pharmacology, mutagenicity and teratogenicity.

In a four-month rat dermal toxicity study, significantly decreased body weight and increased spleen weight were observed at 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg; similar effects were not seen in a four month mouse dermal study. Local dermal irritation, especially at higher doses, was observed in both species.

A two-year mouse carcinogenicity study by dermal administration on three days a week did not induce tumours at the application site. However, the incidences of hepatocellular tumours among treated animals were greater than those for controls. The mechanism for this is not known, but as imiquimod has low systemic absorption from human skin, and is not mutagenic, any risk to humans from systemic exposure is likely to be low. Furthermore, tumours were not seen at any site in a 2-year oral carcinogenicity study in rats.

Imiquimod cream was evaluated in a photocarcinogenicity bioassay in albino hairless mice exposed to simulated solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Animals were administered imiquimod cream three times per week and were irradiated 5 days per week for 40 weeks. Mice were maintained for an additional 12 weeks for a total of 52 weeks. Tumours occurred earlier and in greater number in the group of mice administered the vehicle cream in comparison with the low UVR control group. The significance for man is unknown. Topical administration of imiquimod cream resulted in no tumour enhancement at any dose, in comparison with the vehicle cream group.

6. Pharmaceutical particulars
6.1 List of excipients

isostearic acid

benzyl alcohol

cetyl alcohol

stearyl alcohol

white soft paraffin

polysorbate 60

sorbitan stearate

glycerol

methyl hydroxybenzoate (E218)

propyl hydroxybenzoate (E216)

xanthan gum

purified water.

6.2 Incompatibilities

Not applicable.

6.3 Shelf life

2 years.

6.4 Special precautions for storage

Do not store above 25°C.

Sachets should not be re-used once opened.

6.5 Nature and contents of container

Boxes of 12 or 24 single-use polyester/aluminium foil sachets, containing 250 mg of cream.

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

6.6 Special precautions for disposal and other handling

No special requirements.

7. Marketing authorisation holder

Meda AB

Pipers väg 2A

170 73 Solna

Sweden

8. Marketing authorisation number(s)

EU/1/98/080/001-002

9. Date of first authorisation/renewal of the authorisation

Date of first authorisation: 18/09/1998

Date of last renewal: 03/09/2008

10. Date of revision of the text

April 2010

Company contact details

Meda Pharmaceuticals

Company image
Address

Sky Way House, Parsonage Road, Takeley, Bishop's Stortford, CM22 6PU

Fax

0845 460 0002

Medical Information e-mail
Out of Hours contact

+44 (0)1748 828 810

Telephone

0845 460 0000

Medical Information Direct Line

+44 (0)1748 828 810

Medical Information Fax

+44 (0)1748 828 801

Before you contact this company: often several companies will market medicines with the same active ingredient. Please check that this is the correct company before contacting them. Why?

Active ingredients

imiquimod

Legal categories

POM - Prescription Only Medicine

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